Skip to Main Content
Text size: SmallMediumLargeExtra-Large

Oral Cancer 5-Year Survival Rates by Race, Gender, and Stage of Diagnosis

Oral cancer survival rates have increased approximately 15 percent from the mid 1960s until the latest (2004) National Cancer Institute Survey. In spite of this improvement, significant disparities remain in some population groups.

Table 1 presents the most recent oral cancer survival rates by cancer stage at the time of diagnosis for adult men and women of all ages and for selected racial groups.  Table 2 includes oral cancer survival rates from 1974 to 2003.

Oral Cancer Relative Survival (1996 to 2003)  (Table 1)

  • Overall, 60% of people with oral cancer survive for 5 years.
  • Oral cancer survival rates are significantly lower for Black men and women.
  • Diagnosing oral cancer at an early stage significantly increases 5-year survival rates.

Oral Cancer Relative Survival Trends (Table 2)

  • Oral cancer survival rates have steadily improved since 1975.
  • Disparities in survival rates between White and Black men have remained throughout this time period.

      Table 1: Oral Cancer Relative Survival by Age, Race, and Gender

      Probability in percent of surviving 5 years following a diagnosis of oral cancer, by selected characteristics
      Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, National Cancer Institute
      Surveillance Research Program, based on November 2006 submission of SEER Series 9 (1996-2003)
       
      Most Recent 1996 to 2003

      Race Gender All Stages Localized Regional Distant
      All Races All 60.0 82.8 51.8 27.8
      Male 58.3 82.4 51.6 26.1
      Female 63.4 83.4 52.6 32.1
      White All 62.0 83.3 53.8 27.3
      Male 61.2 83.6 54.3 25.4
      Female 63.6 82.7 52.6 31.8
      Black All 40.6 73.7 33.7 26.2
      Male 35.0 64.0 31.1 25.0
      Female 54.0 86.5 41.0 30.0

        Table 2: Oral Cancer Relative Survival by Age, Race, and Gender (Trends)


        Probability in percent of surviving 5 years following a diagnosis of oral cancer, by selected characteristics
        Source: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, National Cancer Institute
        Surveillance Research Program, based on previous submissions of SEER data (1977-2003)
         
        1975 to 1979 

        Race Gender All Stages Localized Regional Distant
        All Races All 53.4 76.6 41.5 18.8
        Male 52.0 76.0 39.1 17.2
        Female 56.4 77.8 46.4 22.9
        White All 55.1 77.8 42.4 18.2
        Male 54.3 77.8 40.5 16.9
        Female 56.9 77.7 46.4 21.3
        Black All 36.6 56.8 33.6 14.7
        Male 30.6 46.9 29.2 10.7
        Female 48.7 72.4 43.0 23.3

        1985 to 1989 

        Race Gender All Stages Localized Regional Distant
        All Races All 54.6 81.0 42.3 17.5
        Male 51.8 80.4 40.0 14.2
        Female 60.3 82.2 47.2 26.6
        White All 56.9 81.5 43.7 18.4
        Male 54.8 81.1 41.7 15.2
        Female 60.9 82.2 47.8 26.1
        Black All 35.0 70.1 31.3 11.2
        Male 29.9 63.9 28.9 9.5
        Female 47.7 77.7 37.8 18.2

      Share This Page

      GooglePlusExternal link – please review our disclaimer

      LinkedInExternal link – please review our disclaimer

      Print

      This page last updated: January 06, 2014