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Oral Cancer Public Service Announcements

  
Please click on the titles below to play each public service announcement.

 








Scripts

Tough Guy

(30 seconds)

Woman: Have you seen Dr. Roberts about that sore in your mouth?

Man: Nah, I'm sure it'll go away.

Woman: But it's been weeks! It could be oral cancer.

Man: Mouth cancer?

Woman: Yeah, I read that African American men are one of the groups at highest risk.

Man: Alright . . . alright . . . I'll make an appointment.

Music: IN AND UNDER

Anncr: Do you have a tough guy in your house? Make sure he sees a doctor or a dentist if he has a sore in his mouth that lasts more than two weeks. If it is oral cancer, it can be treated more successfully if it's caught early.

A message from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.

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Catching It Early

(60 seconds)

Man: I had a sore in my mouth that just wouldn't go away, and after a couple of weeks I went to my doctor.

Anncr: A sore, lump, or thick patch in your mouth or throat could be a symptom of oral cancer.

Man: My doctor told me I was smart to come in. He said that African American men are one of the groups at highest risk.

It turns out I did have oral cancer. But it was caught early and my treatment was successful. I'm glad I got it checked – that probably saved my life.

Music: IN AND UNDER

Anncr: If you're an African American man, you need to know about oral cancer. Visit a doctor or dentist if you see changes in your mouth that don't go away after two weeks. It's important to get an oral cancer exam – because if you do have cancer, the earlier it's caught, the better.

A message from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.

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African American Men

(30 seconds)

Music: IN AND UNDER

Anncr: If you're an African American man, you need to know about oral cancer. African American men are one of the groups at highest risk for this type of cancer – but many don't know it.

If you have a sore or lump in your mouth that doesn't go away after 2 weeks, see a doctor or a dentist. Most often these symptoms don't mean cancer, but it's important to get them checked.

If you do have oral cancer, it can be treated more successfully if it's caught early.

A message from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health.

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See other items in the "Oral Cancer: What African American Men Need to Know" campaign

Print Materials:

Are you at Risk for Oral Cancer? What African American Men Need to Know 
Brochure: Are You at Risk for Oral Cancer? What African American Men Need to Know
This brochure alerts African American men to their risk for oral cancer, lists the signs and symptoms, and discusses the importance of early detection.

The Oral Cancer Exam 
Oral Cancer Exam Card
A companion to the brochure, this card describes the steps of an oral cancer examination.

Oral Cancer: Causes and Symptoms & The Oral Cancer Exam 
Fact Sheet: Oral Cancer Causes and Symptoms & The Oral Cancer Exam
This fact sheet contains additional information about oral cancer plus an extensive list of references to the medical literature. 

Oral Cancer: What African American Men Need to Know (small poster) 
Poster (8.5" x 11")
This 8.5x11 poster is designed to raise African American men's awareness of their risk for oral cancer and the importance of early detection.

Multimedia:

Video 
Video: Are You at Risk for Oral Cancer? What African American Men Need to Know (3:10)

Widget 
Widgets: African American Men and Oral Cancer


April 2011​​​

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This page last updated: April 27, 2015